Message from the Chair

By Bonnie Weyher

I am honored to serve as Chair of our Section for the 2019-2020 year.

Our other officers this year are Kate Deiter-Maradei, Vice President; Sarah Kromer, Secretary; and Jim Cooley, Treasurer.

Like other Sections, our work is largely done through committees.  I want to thank all those who have agreed to be chairs this year: Arbitration  (Catharine Arrowood/George Doyle); CLE (John Sarratt / Deborah Dillman); Clerk Mediation (Bill Wolcott/Nick Gordon); Collaborative Law (John Sarratt/Aida Doss Havel); Collaborative Family Law (Kerry Burleigh/Deborah Dilman); Communications/Website/Social Media (Ketan Soni); Ethics & Professionalism (Thomas Clare/Jim Cooley); Legislative & Rapid Response (Andy Little/Frank Laney); Membership (Arty Bolick); Nominations (Ann Anderson / Frank Laney); Observation Video (Ann Anderson/Jacqueline Clare); and Pro Bono (Rick Igou/Salim Uqdah).

We will keep you updated throughout the year on projects and initiatives of the Section.   In the meantime, please mark your calendars for our Annual Meeting and CLE/CME, which will be at Pinehurst on Thursday, March 12, 2020.  We will have a reception the evening before for those arriving on Wednesday.

Nominations Committee

By Ann Anderson

In December 2019 and January 2020, the Dispute Resolution Nominating Committee will be seeking nominations for 8 new Council Members and a recipient of the 2020 Peace Award. An email will be sent soliciting nominations. In the meantime please be thinking about whether you would be willing to serve or would like to nominate a Section member.

Members of the Council serve three-year terms and attend quarterly Section Council meetings. Council members must be members of the Section and should be willing to participate actively on one or more Section projects.

The Peace Award is given by the Section to one or more individuals who have made a special contribution or commitment to the peaceful resolution of disputes. Last year LeAnn Nease Brown was our Section Peace Award winner. For more information about the award and other past recipients see the following: https://ncbarblog.com/lets-recognize-the-peacemakers-among-us/ 

Collaborative Training In Asheville June 19-20

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The NCBA has offered six basic training courses in Collaborative Law Practice in the past, and is offering the next one June 19-20  in Asheville. Click here to view the brochure with all the details and to register.

Collaborative Practice Training
Wednesday-Thursday, June 19-20, 2019
Renaissance Asheville Hotel

This 14-hour training is for any lawyer who wishes to add the collaborative approach to their practice, whether they are family lawyers or other civil lawyers, including those practicing in the areas of construction, employment, small business, probate, as well as general litigation. Because collaborative law is practiced entirely out of court, it is not necessary to have training or experience as a litigator to become a collaborative lawyer.

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Spotlight on Salim Uqdah

DR Spotlight is a Q&A series that focuses on Dispute Resolution Section members.

Salim Uqdah is a paralegal-mediator and the owner and director of Mediation for Uroboros Mediations, LLC in Charlotte. His work includes handling domestic, civil, criminal, special proceedings, and estates cases.

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Hats, Bracketology and PSAP

By Nancy Norelli

The Dispute Resolution Section CLE and Annual Meeting, held in the midst of March Madness, was a big success. Donna Savage and her team put together an outstanding program. All the speakers presented interesting ideas and gave the attendees the value of their decades of conflict resolution experience.

You can still view the program and get CLE and CME Credits.  Video replays are set in Cary on May 31 and Concord on June 14.  Sign-up here.

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Dispute Resolution Commission Quarterly Meeting

The North Carolina Dispute Resolution Commission (NCDRC) held its quarterly meeting on March 1, 2019, at the Washington Duke Inn in Durham.  The meeting, led by the Commission’s chair, the Honorable William A. Webb, was extremely productive as well as informative.  Each of the NCDRC’s numerous committees reported on work completed this past quarter including, but not limited to, proposing a new draft version of Standard VII, approving courses for CME credit, and reviewing multiple applications for certification. The NCDRC also adopted a new policy regarding mediators responding to complaints, and is making plans to celebrate Conflict Resolution Week this coming October.  The NCDRC constantly strives to better the practice of mediation within our courts by providing certified mediators with the tools they need to succeed. For more information on the NCDRC and the actions taken by the Commission this past quarter, please visit our website at www.NCDRC.gov, and check out our News and Articles link located within the Mediator’s Toolbox.

 

Spotlight On Frank Laney

DR Spotlight is a Q&A series that focuses on Dispute Resolution Section members.

Frank Laney is Circuit Mediator for the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. He lives in Cary with his wife, Anne, who is principle flute with the N.C. Symphony. Laney teaches Mediation Advocacy at Campbell Law School and goes to Belarus yearly to work with mediators there.

 

 

 

 

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Spotlight on Kate Deiter-Maradei

DR Spotlight is a Q&A series that focuses on Dispute Resolution Section members.

Kate Deiter-Maradei is a mediator in Raleigh at Deiter Mediation. Kate has been mediating full time for almost six years after practicing as a litigation attorney for 10 years with Teague Campbell. She has been on the NCBA Dispute Resolution Section Council for several years and is currently the secretary. Kate enjoys travel, is passionate about adoption and enjoys working with Essential Partners to conduct facilitated dialogues between law enforcement folks and African-American community leaders in the Triangle.

 

 

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Running Blind in Multi-Party Mediations

By John Ong

Running blind in a multiparty mediation may seem, at first glance, to be dangerous.  In reality, negotiating without knowing the amount that co-defendants are offering, i.e. being “blind” is a frequently used tactic in larger construction cases as it expedites the process of negotiations.  By purposefully choosing not to be informed about the nature and extent of offers being made by their co-defendants, parties are faced with individually making their own decisions about value and risk. Collectively, this often resolves a case.

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Spotlight on Will Oden

DR Spotlight is a Q&A series that focuses on Dispute Resolution Section members.

Will Oden lives in Wilmington, North Carolina, and has practiced with Ward and Smith, P.A. in the areas of employment law and workers’ compensation since 2004, when he graduated from law school.  He also serves as a mediator in employment and workers’ compensation cases.  According to Will, any virtues he possesses come directly from his parents; the fault for the rest lies with him.

 

 

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