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WFU Law School Mom: This Is How She Does It

 By Ashley Oldfield

“I don’t know how you do it!”—that’s the response I usually get when I tell someone that I’m in law school and a parent.  I’m never sure how to respond because, frankly, I don’t know how I do it, either.  Law school is stressful and demanding for anyone, and it’s no surprise that having a family doesn’t make the experience any easier. In the end, I managed to effectively navigate through my first year, and I’d like to share a few of the lessons that I learned along the way.

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The “NOT To-Do List” to Manage Tasks and Distractions

Paul Unger’s presentation on taming digital chaos is one of 6.0 hours of CLE included with your NCBA Annual Meeting registration. Sign up now to reserve your space. 

By Paul Unger

Social Media, Facebook, Instagram, client fires, 24-hour news, Trump, hurricanes, murders, crime, Russia, North Korea, 150 emails a day, constant interruptions, … It’s too much for us handle and it is resulting in workday paralysis, even before you sit down to start your day!

In my CLE seminars, webinars, and my upcoming book, I outline many strategies to manage tasks and distractions. However, I thought it might help to state them a slightly different way … as a “NOT to do list”. Here are 12 “NOTS” to keep yourself laser-focused.

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‘Where She Has Practiced Her Entire Career’: Reflections On Coming a Long Way

By Bettie Kelley Sousa

A recent e-bar announced the installation of Caryn Coppedge McNeill, the new president of the North Carolina Bar Association, and the election of the president-elect, Jacqueline D. Grant. A demanding, virtually full-time job spanning three years, the NCBA presidency often is held by big-firm lawyers who can commit such time to the profession and continue to feed their families. What’s not as common—the appointment of back-to-back female presidents.

Having practiced for 36 years, I believe it’s only happened once before.* My first reaction to this girl power moment had me nodding “ ‘bout time.” But, my second reaction was in response to the end of the paragraph about each woman. Listed after her firm was the phrase “where she has practiced her entire career.” Yes, I thought. I’m not surprised. Firm longevity is getting rare, but I’ll bet women constitute, percentage-wise, more of those who stay with the same firm from bar passage to retirement.

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Practice Series: Question and Answer with a Civil Litigator

Matthew D. Quinn is a 2009 graduate of the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law at Campbell University.  He practices with the Law Offices of F. Bryan Brice Jr. in Raleigh.

Q:  What kind of law do you practice?

A:  I have a general civil litigation practice.  I typically, but not always, represent the plaintiff.  Over the years, I have developed a niche practice of representing individuals and families injured by mold contamination.  In fact, I have found that the best way to build a practice is to find a discreet type of case and build up experience in that area.  There are not many mold litigators, so I receive a lot of those cases.

Q:  What do you like best about your practice?

A:  The diversity of duties.  I might spend one day reading, writing, and researching.  The next day I could spend in the field at a property inspection, or perhaps learning about a scientific issue at an expert’s office.  Then twenty-four hours later, I could be at a court hearing.  There is never a dull moment in civil litigation.

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