Category: Sports & Entertainment Law Section (page 1 of 3)

Items of Interest: Hidden Liability of March Madness Pools, Powerball Winner Sues for Anonymity

Members of the Sports & Entertainment Law Section found the following recent third-party articles to be of potential interest to the Section.

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Items of Interest: German IP Law and Esports, Mark Hammill, Media Modernization

Members of the Sports & Entertainment Law Section found the following recent third-party articles to be of potential interest to the Section.

Let the games begin: German IP law in the world of esports

Endorsement Lands Mark Hamill in TINA’s Sarlacc Pit

Next Media Modernization Proposals – Eliminate FCC Filing Requirement for Certain Broadcast Licensee Contracts and Expunge Analog TV Rules

All the Money in the World: Mark Wahlberg, Michelle Williams, and Wage Disparity Issues

Vegas Golden Knights Brand in Free-Fall?

“Ticket-gate”- Revisiting the Intersection of Professional Football and Class Actions

Massachusetts to Tax Fantasy Sports?

Copyright Royalty Board Decision Will Raise Royalties Paid to Songwriters and Publishers By Digital Music Services

After the Supreme Court Touchdown, Washington Redskins Are Finally Winning at the Fourth Circuit and the PTO

Winter Is Coming

It’s alive! The public domain starts breathing again

Iron Maiden gets heavy with trademark infringers

Not So Blurred Lines

Contracts in football – the unconventional, bizarre and shocking

Gambling Laws Created Daily Fantasy Sports. Now It Could Cripple Them

TTAB denies Beyoncé requests in BLUE IVY CARTER Trademark Opposition Proceedings

Appeals court vacates decisions that canceled Redskins trademark registrations

The Larry Nassar Case and What Comes Next

In Michigan State Investigation, N.C.A.A. Moves Beyond Its Comfort Zone 

NBA Pushes For Legal Sports Betting in New York, But Wants Piece of the Action

Cleveland Indians Will Remove Chief Wahoo Logo From Uniforms in 2019  

Current Legal Issue: Muhammad Ali Sues Fox

By Jonathan Lewis

On June 3, 2016, boxing legend Muhammad Ali passed away from sepsis in an Arizona hospital, after a long fight with Parkinson’s disease.[1] Ali was known for his brash, braggadocious banter before bouts, as much as he was known for his fighting style in the ring. Many, including (and especially) Ali himself, regard him as the greatest boxer ever. After winning an Olympic Gold medal, becoming the then-youngest ever heavyweight champion at the age of 21, losing and regaining the heavyweight title twice more, and inventing both the “Ali shuffle” and the “rope-a-dope,” he was probably right.[2]

Aside from being a great boxer, Ali was also an entrepreneur. In 2006, Ali sold 80 percent of his company, G.O.A.T. LLC (Greatest of All Time), for $50,000,000.  G.O.A.T. LLC, which was subsequently renamed Muhammad Ali Enterprises LLC (MAE), controlled the use of Ali’s intellectual property, including his name, image, likeness, and rights of publicity.[3]

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Of Interest: A Win For Dr. Seuss, Ruling On ‘Empire,’ Tax Cut Repercussions

Members of the Sports & Entertainment Law Section found the following recent third-party articles to be of potential interest to the Section.

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Of Interest: Fantasy Sports Legalization, Tax Reform, Kaye v. Cartoon Network

Members of the Sports & Entertainment Law Section found the following recent third-party articles to be of potential interest to the Section.

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The Kissing Defense: Professional Athletes, Drugs and the ‘No Fault/No Significant Fault’ Tests in Arbitration

By Martin Maloney

Arbitration and Reducing a Suspension Under the No Fault/No Significant Fault Tests

In 2014, Major League Baseball (“MLB”) and the MLB Players Association (the “MLBPA”) agreed to a joint drug prevention program aimed at strengthening the detection and enforcement against players’ use of prohibited recreational and performance-enhancing drugs (“PEDs”).[1] As part of the agreement, MLB incorporated a “no fault/no significant fault” tests, whereby an arbitration panel may vacate a player’s mandatory suspension for testing positive to the use of banned substances if the player can demonstrate that “the presence of the Prohibited Substance in his test result was not due to his fault or negligence,” or reduce the length of the suspension if the player can provide “clear and convincing evidence that he bears no significant fault or negligence.”[2] For instance, Raul Mondesi Jr.’s eighty-game suspension for a first time violation of MLB’s drug policy in 2016 was reduced to fifty-games after Mondesi was able to demonstrate that his positive test of a banned substance was inadvertent and the result of taking an over-the-counter cold and flu medicine he had bought while in the Dominican Republic.[3]

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Of Interest: Playwright Wins Copyright Dispute, Board Blows the Whistle, Dickerson v. WB Studio

Sports & Entertainment Law

Members of the Sports & Entertainment Law Section found the following recent third party articles to be of potential interest to the Section:

Joy in Who-Ville? Playwright Wins Fair Use Copyright Dispute in Parody of “Grinch”

Board Blows the Whistle on Independent Contractor Status for NBA Video Production Crew

Dickerson v. WB Studio Enterprises, Inc., et al.

Can NFL Players be Fired, Disciplined for Protesting During National Anthem?

Mark Ronson Sued For Infringing 80’s Funk “Masterpiece”

Politics in the Workplace: Do NFL Players Have Freedom of Speech To Protest at Games?

Court Holds that Fantasy Sports Companies Did Not Violate Players’ Rights by Using Their Names and Likenesses

Hackers Score Touchdown: NFL Players Association Hit With Data Breach

Doubling (& Tripling) Down on Trademark Protection For Secret Menu Items–In-N-Out v. Smashburger

No “Contract By Tweet” for Plaintiff Who Pitches Movie Idea via Social Media  

Advanced stages of CTE found in Aaron Hernandez’s brain

‘Please don’t make us call your mom,’ Netflix tells pop-up bar owners in cease-and-desist letter  

N.C.A.A. Coaches, Adidas Executive Face Charges; Pitino’s Program Implicated

King’s College Football Coach Sued For Copyright Infringement For Retweeting A Book Page 2 Years Ago

Spectrum Center rebounds after HB2 repeal

Charlotte Hornets could score larger TV deal in 2018

Laurene Powell Jobs buys stake worth around $500 million in DC sports empire

Lawsuit accuses Kmart of copying Halloween banana costume

CBS fires lawyer over Facebook posts calling Vegas shooting victims likely ‘Republican gun toters’

‘Tip of the iceberg’: More charges expected this month in college basketball scandal

New true crime TV series should reopen debate over cameras in the courtroom

Of Interest: Major League Soccer Challenged, Tyson Knockout Blow, Odell Beckham Calls Audible

Sports & Entertainment Law

Members of the Sports & Entertainment Law Section found the following recent third party articles to be of potential interest to the Section:

Major League Soccer Challenged in CAS

Tyson Winds Up for Knockout Blow Against Boxing Hall of Fame

Odell Beckham Jr. Calls Audible on $100M Player Disability Insurance Policy

Former Band Member Sues The Roots

Ineligible Coach On The Field – Assessing Whether Restrictions Are Enforceable In Contracts

Fan Was Expecting Goldfinger, but Instead Got Oddjob: Woman Sues Movie Studios over James Bond Movie Collection

Brittle v. Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Ronnie Van Zant, Inc. v. Artimus Pyle

Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions

Leadership on the sidelines should not be defined by gender

Remember FCC Rules on Underwriting Limitations – And that They Don’t Apply to Spots Bought By Nonprofit Entities

Baylor Settles Lawsuit in Sexual Assault Case

How Red Sox Used Tech, Step by Step, to Steal Signs From Yankees

Home of Brazil’s Top Olympic Official Is Searched in Bribe Inquiry

Chicago Bears Back Off GoBears Hashtag Dispute Over Trademark Concern With Cal

Lunch-hour CLE With a Rock Star: The Slants Front Man Talks About the Legal Battle To Name His Band

Spend your Monday lunch hour chatting with a rock star while earning CLE/CPE credit. Register for the webcast “A Name Worth Fighting For: How Naming My Band The Slants Got Me To the Supreme Court,” featuring rocker Simon Tam, presented by the NCBA CLE Department. Members of the NCBA  Intellectual Property Law, Litigation, and Sports & Entertainment Law sections enjoy a discounted rate.

Tam, founder and bassist of The Slants, will talk about how his fight with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office over his band’s name led to a U.S. Supreme Court case. The webcast discussion runs from noon to 1 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 18. Tam will answer audience questions and speak frankly about racism, legal troubles and his incredible stories of playing in the world’s “first and only Asian-American dance rock band.”

Here’s a preview of Monday’s conversation, based on a Q&A with Joyce Brafford, NCBA’s  Distance Learning Manager for CLE.

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