Author: Amber Nimocks (page 1 of 2)

Annual Meeting Preview: Five Questions With Fastcase CEO Ed Walters

By Amber Nimocks

This year’s NCBA Annual Meeting features a rockstar lineup of legal innovators from around the country. Among them is Ed Walters,  CEO of Fastcase and a leader in Artificial Intelligence integrations for the legal profession.

Walters will present a CLE titled “Ethics of Artificial Intelligence” on Saturday, June 23 at 12:30 at the Wilmington Convention Center. Registration for NCBA Annual Meeting includes CLE  while availability remains. Sign up by May 1 to secure your place.

Here’s a quick look at Walters’ take on AI and the future of the law.

Are you concerned about AI changing the legal profession’s understanding of ethics?

I’m more concerned with how we apply the existing ethical rules to new tech, including AI.  The ethics rules (for the most part) stay the same, and we apply them to a changing world.  Sounds easy, but it’s actually pretty hard.

Most of our ethical rules exist to protect clients – but when machines begin analyzing legal problems, our rules break down.  With existing lawyer regulations, we regulate the inputs: lawyers have to graduate from an accredited law school, pass the bar exam, pass character and fitness, and in many states, do continuing legal education.  We presume that people who satisfy those conditions are fit to dispense legal advice.

Those questions are irrelevant to machines.  Could Watson pass the bar exam?  Probably – but would that mean that it could give competent legal advice?  Probably not.  With software, we’d probably want to look at outputs: is the advice accurate and up to date?

Think about TurboTax.  Is there any question that the software is interpreting tax law?  No – but it isn’t licensed anywhere. Do we need to regulate TurboTax?  No.  But we also wouldn’t let Intuit start representing clients in legal matters either.  We’re not yet ready to draw the lines, but that world is coming fast.

Continue reading

Sunday Best: Catch Up On the Week’s Top NCBarBlog Posts

Here’s what NCBarBlog readers found most interesting on our pages this week:

ICO Primer: A Revolution in Startup Financing or a Regulatory Nightmare?

Jack of All Trades: Embrace It 

On Fonts: Why Lawyers Should Switch To Century Schoolbook

Employer’s Attempt At Repayment Of Training Costs Can Backfire Causing Employee Misclassification Under the FLSA

NC Free Legal Answers: Pro Bono At Your Fingertips

Sunday Best: Catch Up On the Week’s Top NCBarBlog Posts

Here’s what NCBarBlog readers found most interesting on our pages this week:

NC Free Legal Answers: Pro Bono At Your Fingertips

NC’s New Expunction Law Offers Juvenile Offenders a Fresh Start

Phyllis Pickett: A Woman for All Seasons

NC Court of Appeals Issues Decisions Analyzing Disability Post-Wilkes

Paralegal Potpourri Friday: PD Annual Meeting, CPE, Awards, Nominations, Etc.

Sunday Best: Catch Up On the Week’s Top NCBarBlog Posts

Here’s what NCBarBlog readers found most interesting on our pages this week:

Court of Appeals Allows Section 75-1.1 Claim in Context of Residential Real Estate Transaction

An Untapped Source of Savings for State and Local Government Owners of Property

A 12(b)(6) Motion Asserted As Part Of An Answer Will Not Suffice, At Least Not In The NC Business Court

Launching the Appellate Practice Section Blog with Exciting News!

Say Hello To the Small Firm & Technology Section

A Win For Arbitration in 2018

Sunday Best: Catch Up on the Week’s Top NCBarBlog Posts

Here’s what NCBarBlog readers found most interesting on our pages this week:

Make Your Writing More ‘Impactful’: Banish Trendy Words

What Your Trial Court Administrator Wants You to Know, Parts 1, 2 and 3: Triad and Sandhills, Western Region and Eastern Region

In the Wake of Charlotte School Of Law’s Demise, What Awaits Those Left Behind?

Forming an LLC: Walking Your Client Through the Paperwork, Part 1

The Future Has Arrived; Come Take a Look At Annual Meeting

Attorney-Rapper Lex-Jordan Ibegbu Relies On Both Rhyme and Reason

By Amber Nimocks

When summoning the confidence to impress a judge or woo a jury, young attorney Lex-Jordan Ibegbu relies on his years as a rapper growing up in Southeast Raleigh, where he spent much of his time writing rhymes and speaking his truth to crowds big and small.

“Rapping has given me a certain level of comfort when speaking to people,” he says. “MC means ‘Move the Crowd.’ When you are in court, it is similar to a stage, your crowd is the judge or the jury.”

A lifelong North Carolinian, Ibegbu, 27, attended Cary Academy and UNC-Chapel Hill before he headed south for a few years to earn his law degree at the University Of Miami School of Law. He returned home to Southeast Raleigh to begin his practice a year and a half ago, focusing on myriad areas including criminal defense, traffic court, business law, family law, entertainment, sports and government. Growing up in Southeast Raleigh shaped him, Ibegbu says.

Continue reading

#NCBA In Japan: Attorneys Exchange Ideas, Soak In Culture

As the NCBA’s Attorney Exchange Program delegation wraps up its trip to Japan this week, we’re sharing the group’s impressions of the Land of the Rising Sun. Throughout the trip, members of the delegation have been offering their favorite moments via our social media channels. To see photos, go to the NCBA Facebook page  or follow the group on Twitter at #NCBAinJapan.

Also, we talked via Skype with David Robinson, International Law & Practice Section member and Honorary Consul of Japan in North Carolina. Well-versed in Japanese culture, Robinson helped organize the trip and the group’s meetings with law firms, government officials, businesses and bar organizations. Here’s a 90-second video with photos and excerpts of the interview.

How One Attorney Turned a $10-an-hour Tech Job Into a Career In Patent Law: Hear the Story at ‘Starting Out Solo’

Ever wonder how lawyers with great jobs got their sweet gigs? Then this free event is for you. Join us at the N.C. Bar Center on Tuesday, Sept. 26 at 6 p.m. for a panel of practicing attorneys who have career advice to share. Get more details and register here.

Panelists are Nicholas Dowgul of Felton Banks PLLC, Wes Saunders of the N.C. DOJ, Lyle Gravatt with NK Patent Law, and Daniel Moose of The Law Offices of Daniel R. Moose. Starting Out Solo is free, and dinner will be provided, so RSVP. All law students and legal professionals who want to learn more about law practice management are encouraged to attend. For questions, contact Jeremy Williams.

In advance of the panel, Lyle Gravatt answered a few questions about his path from $10-an-hour tech analyst to firm attorney with NK Patent Law.

Q: With experience as an entrepreneur and a degree in physics, what motivated you to pursue a law degree and practice?

A: I had a very nontraditional pathway to a legal career. I started out as a biophysics researcher and slowly realized that being in a lab just wasn’t for me. I had some skills as an extrovert that the lab setting didn’t allow me to use. And working in a lab has a very narrow focus. So, I went the complete opposite direction and I got involved in entrepreneurship, particularly sales. That again steered me toward an industry that was very narrowly focused. I was merely exercising the social aspects of myself and not really challenging the intellectual aspects. After trying out those two extremes I felt like the legal field would allow me to exercise my intellectual passions and my passion for people and my more extroverted tendencies. And intellectual property law allowed me to dive back into the science, which I always enjoyed.

Q: How did you arrive at your current position?

A: When I first graduated from law school at the University of Mississippi, I went to work for the law school developing a pro bono program that’s now in place. After I left, I was studying for the Louisiana bar, and I was really struggling, trying to get an IT job in that area. So, I packed up my bags, I put a bunch of suits in the car, printed out a bunch of resumes and I went on a Southeast tour – where all my friends lived —  and started knocking on doors because emails and phone calls weren’t working.

When I got here to the Triangle area, somebody hired me for $10 an hour to be a tech analyst. It was a company that was associated with a law firm, where the tech company and the law firm worked together and were housed in the same offices. That was my in. I started out as a tech analyst, and a year later I was working in the law firm, and two years later I was transitioning out to a traditional law firm.

I saw the tech job as an opportunity to get into the company with my science background and allow myself to gain some legal experience and hopefully transition to the legal side, which did happen.

Continue reading

By Amber Nimocks

A few months ago, we asked NCBA members to respond to a short survey on the growing possibility of North Carolina’s adoption of a Uniform Bar Exam. More than 300 readers chimed in. Below is a snapshot of the results along with a few of the many reader comments. To read all the comments poll takers left, go to the North Carolina Lawyer page of our website.

 

POLL RESULTS

What is your reaction to the N.C. Board of Law Examiners’ move toward adopting the Uniform Bar Exam?

The majority of the 311 respondents, 59 percent, reacted in favor of the change.

89 or 29 percent: “It’s about time.”

95 or 30 percent: “It’s a good idea.”

127 or 41 percent: “It’s an abomination.”

Continue reading

After Years Of Wrongful Imprisonment, Darryl Howard Was Sustained By Love, Redeemed By Justice

By Amber Nimocks

Darryl and Nannie Howard banter gently, laughing and smiling a bit like newlyweds, a bit like the long-married couple they are. Their ease and happiness with each other seem to belie the 24 years of physical separation they have endured.

Until late this summer, Howard was imprisoned, serving time for crimes he insisted he was innocent of from the start. He walked out of a Durham courtroom on Aug. 31 after Superior Court Judge Orlando Hudson vacated guilty verdicts against him in a 1991 double murder. The decision came after Howard’s attorneys presented the judge with DNA evidence that had not been presented to the jury that heard Howard’s case. The evidence excluded Howard from the murders of Doris Washington and her 13-year-old daughter Nishonda and linked two others to the crime scene. The Durham District Attorney’s Office did not appeal the ruling.

Continue reading

Older posts

© 2018 L3: Long Leaf Law

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑